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Unigene initiates oral PTH Phase 2 study in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

September 08, 2017

Normally, according to Hussain, when we ingest glucose, the pancreatic beta cells release an initial burst of insulin almost immediately, then gradually release more insulin about 15 minutes later. However, people with type 2 diabetes and mice engineered to react metabolically like people with type 2 diabetes don't release this initial spurt of insulin when fed glucose, but still have the later gradual insulin release.

"We knew how important the first burst of insulin is for controlling our blood sugar, but we did not know what really went wrong in our beta cells in people with type 2 diabetes," says Hussain. "We have drugs that restore the first burst of insulin and yet we did not completely understand how they work."

Hussain then questioned whether Snapin could be used to fix the defects in cells from a diabetic animal.

Since the cells with Snapin on made too much insulin, researchers wanted to see if they could use this to restore these mice's ability to secrete the initial burst of insulin. After growing pancreatic beta cells from type 2 diabetes mice in a dish and engineering them to make the Snapin-on protein, the researchers fed the cells glucose and found that they did indeed regain the ability to release that initial insulin burst.

"While keeping Snapin on in these mouse cells corrects the problem in this animal model of type 2 diabetes, we're still a long way from knowing if the same mechanism will work in people, but this gives us an encouraging start," says Hussain.

Source: Cell Metabolism